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Number of Titles: 18

Women's Boxing

Gallery1

Corporate1

Portraits1

St. John

Oyster Fisherman

Pizey's Pies

Drag Queens Shop

Emergency Response

Italian World Cup UK

Random Photos

Andreas Michli

Prodigy

High Road House

Singles

Jan De Cock

Mobiles

Causeymire Windfarm

Number of Captions: 146

Drag Queens and performance artists, Xtina Draguilera, Ryan Styles and Jonny Woo put on their make-up before going shopping.

One of only 16 professional women boxers in the UK, Shanee Martin prepares to fight for the British masters Superflyweight title at a Leisure Centre in Dagenham, East London.

Asked about his look Jonny Woo says 'Get into your look. You choose it, now make it work for YOU!'

The selection of suitable day wear is an important and time consuming task.

Pedestrians walk past the exterior of St. Alban, an exclusive restaurant in London's West End set up by the former owners of the Ivy.

Martin Sorrell, CEO of WPP WPP is the world's second largest advertising company. At the company's offices, central London

Ryan's style icons look down from the wall of his flat. His eyebrows are modelled on Frida Kahlo's.

Xtina models herself on Christina Aguilera. Her beauty tip is: 'If you want to make a real statement with your lips, wear red Rimmel lipstick and then apply some glitter on top. It's my signature look.' Xtina selects some pink knickers from a stall on Dalston market, a bargain at 50p a pair.

In 'Party Party,' a party and fancy dress shop in Dalston, Xtina tries on a pair of fake boobs.

Next stop is 'Beyond Retro,' a large scale vintage clothing store in London's East End. Woo and Styles are unsuspectingly surprised while in the changing rooms.

At 'Beyond Retro' Ryan creates his 'prim day look' based on Charlotte from 'Sex in the City.'

At 'Beyond Retro,' Draguilera goes for the Alexis Carrington 1980s look with a slutty black frock and spiky red patent leather stilettos, while Woo opts for a more suburban 1970s Margot Ledbetter red day dress.

The 'girls' hail a taxi outside 'Beyond Retro.'

At theatre shop, Charles Fox in London's West End, Woo and Xtina experiment with make-up and wigs.

Woo gives Ryan a final make-over before ending a hard day's shopping.

Trainer Peter Martin (no relation) tapes Shanee's knuckles.

Lethal Bizzle, Grime MC and Rapper On the set of the video for 'Police on My Back'

Monica Ali, Author Wrote the best selling novel 'Brick Lane' about Bengali immigrants in London's East End.

John Hutton, Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Announcing changes to the government's pension policies in Whitehall, London.

Clown attending Grimaldi Day A church service celebrating the life of Joseph Grimaldi, seen as the father of modern day clowning at Holy Trinity Church, Dalston, London

Ed Husain, Writer and Anti-Islamist Husain stands in front of the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel. In his book 'the Islamist' detailing his radicalisation and subsequent disiillusionment with militant islam, he describes how he would join Hizb-ut-Tahrir meetings in a hired room at the hospital

Antonio Carluccio, Chef Owns the 'Carluccio's' chain of restaurants and writes cookery books, at a cooking demonstration in central London.

Jean Christophe Novelli, Chef At a cooking demonstration in central London.

Clockwise from top left: Pastry is placed on an apple pie, a baked cheesecake is checked for consistency, the filling for apple pies is prepared and some cold desserts are prepared.

Shanee undergoes a medical check before the fight. Shanee comes from a traditional boxing background in Dagenham, local to the fight, her loyalty to her area is shown by her wearing of the West Ham Footbal Club's shirt and by fighting in the West Ham colours.

Trainer Peter Martin spars with boxer Shanee Martin

Trainer Terry Coulter spars with boxer Shanee Martin, while a helper looks on. Says Martin on boxing and the idea that women are less agressive: 'It's natural to me. I'm comfortable in the ring. I don't fight people on the street and I'm not manly at all. But physical aggression is natural to me. Some men don't like fighting either.'

Trainer Peter Martin smears vaseline on Shanee's face, while co-trainer Coulter looks on.

Shanee walks to the ring.

Shanee enters the ring.

The fight begins. This is the first female Masters fight to be sanctioned by the British Boxing Board of Control (BBBofC).

Trainers Peter Martin (left) and Terry Coulter (centre) prepare Martin for another round. Shanee finally lost on points to Winter, after 8 rounds, 79 75.

Women's boxing is still controversial in the UK with many boxing promoters refusing to be involved with the sport.

It was illegal for women to box until 1996 and in 1998, Jane Couch a World Welter Weight Champion had to take the BBB of C to court to gain a license.

An Italian Social Club next to Clerkenwell's Italian Church hosted a relatively gentile gathering to watch the Semi Finals versus Ukraine

Elderly gentlemen occasionally paused their card games to eye a save or possible goal.

Professional make-up artists are on hand to prepare for the match.

An old man paints himself in the colours of the Italian flag.

Hundreds of fans gather outside the famous Bar Italia in Soho to watch the final against France.

London's 50,000 strong Italian population watched their football team play the 2006 World Cup Final at various locations in the capital. Here an Italian boy waves a flag outside Bar Italia in Soho.

After winning, fans head to Trafalgar Square.

Once in Trafalgar Square Italian fans take over the front terrace of the National Gallery.

Fans wave an Italian flag on the front terrace of the National Gallery.

The ERU deal with a range of problems such as repairing holes in trackside fences to removing people dead or alive (only half survive), after they have fallen under a train. Here a signalling part is delivered to Archway Station on the Northern Line in the middle of the night.

Christalla recently developed diabetes, which she puts down to her previous habit of eating jam with a spoon, she says life has been hard.

Clockwise from top left: The number of items remaining on the menu is changed, a beef and kidney pie acquires it's crust, welsh rarebit is prepared and crabs are dressed.

Parsley is chopped while peeled garlic sits in the foreground.

Ni Lenette, Restauranteur Mauritian-born, Sushi chef, asian tea expert and fashion guru, Ni also runs the Macaron Patisserie in Clapham.

Pastry is prepared for a beef and kidney pie. St John revel in using the bits of animals that we eat undisclosed and minced beyond recognition every day in pork pies and sausages, offal.

A customer squeezes lemon juice onto an oyster at Richard's stall in Pimlico Market, London.

A waitress checks the glasses before service.

A waitress receives instructions from the head chef.

Richard Haward is an eighth generation oyster fisherman based in Mersea Island, Essex. Native English oysters from Mersea are rated amongst the best in Europe, many finding their way to restaurant tables in Paris.

Smoked sprats and horseradish wait to be served while customers enjoy their meals.

Richard displays his oysters on his market stall in Pimlico in London. Native English oysters have a flatter shell and a meatier flesh than the rock oysters popular on the continent.

A suckling kid faggot and mash waits to be served. The consumption of offal has fallen by a fifth since the 70s. St.John sets out to reverse this decline, preparing simple and traditional British meat dishes from quality livestock.

Food orders hang outside the kitchen while smoked sprats and horseradish are served.

A skate and tartar sauce waits to be served.

Ham hock is served with butter beans. Despite it's proximity, current Head Chef Ed Lewis explains that meat is rarely bought from Smithfields because the source of the meat is unknown. St John prefer to buy directly from individual British farms where the good care of animals can be assured.

St. John Restaurant is situated in a former Georgian townhouse and smokehouse, near Smithfields meat market. It was founded in October 1994 by Fergus Henderson around his old fashioned concept of nose to tail eating, using every part of the animal for cooking.

Situated on tidal mud flats, Mersea is seperated from the mainland only part of the day, when even the road onto the island is covered in water.

Richard examines wild oysters dredged from the centre of the river.

A man eats oysters served at Richard's restaurant the Company Shed, on Mersea Island, Essex.

A seafood platter served at the Company Shed, Mersea Island.

A seafood platter served at the Company Shed, Mersea Island.

A girl prepares crabs at Richard's rough styled but excellent seafood restaurant serving seafood platters and fried fish on Mersea Island. Customers need to bring their own bread and wine.

Richard Haward in his restaurant, the Company Shed.

The farming and fishing of oysters is a seasonal affair. Oysters bought from the solent or the Blackwater river in February are placed on the banks of Mersea and marked with tree branches or 'withies' and then taken up in September.

Richard travels back along the Black water river to his home in Mersea.

Scoth Eggs created by Roger Pizey. The good humoured mancunian baker provides traditional English pastries to Peyton and Byrne, owned by restaurant proprietor and occasional TV celebrity Oliver Peyton. The aim of Peyton and Byrne is to revive the good old fashioned British savoury snack.

Chocolate fairy cakes sold at Peyton and Byrne.

Roger Pizey creates a pie at his bakery under the Mash brewery, North of Oxford street in central London.

I live in the Harringay, Green Lanes area of North London, one of the most multicultural areas in Britain. Some of the first immigrants to arrive in Harringay were Greek Cypriot. A small group arrived in the late fifties looking for work and set up shops and restaurants in the area. Among these was Andreas Michli.

Fig rolls.

Fairy cakes created by Roger Pizey and sold at Peyton and Byrne.

Roger Pizey with his creations in the Peyton and Byrne shop.

In the summer Andreas sits outside the shop in a plastic chair.

Traditional pork pies created by Roger Pizey and sold at Peyton and Byrne.

A pie on display at the Peyton and Byrne shop.

A woman walks past the exterior of Peyton and Byrne on Tottenham Court Road in central London.

Roger's pastries served at the National Dining Room, in the National Gallery.

Roger's fairy cakes served at the National Dining Room, in the National Gallery.

In addition to melons, Andreas sells just about everything - rat traps, lucky Turkish eyes, busts of Beethoven and Greek philosophers, crucifixes, kippers, snails, pumpkins, replicas of ancient Greek sculptures and Byzantine icons, as well as olives which he prepares himself.

A great deal of this merchandise doesn't sell well, especially the sculptures which litter the shop gathering dust. Every morning a sculpture of Jesus, is taken out and tied to a bollard outside the shop.

Andreas sees little business apart from on Friday afternoon when orthodox Jews from the neighbouring area of Stamford Hill come to buy melons for the Sabbath.

Christalla weighs some of Andreas' home made beetroot, kept in a stainless steel pot near the counter.

Christalla has worked in Andreas' shop since the seventies.

Andreas tells me about the glory days of the past when people would queue around the block to buy food from the shop. Most of the Greek Cypriot population has moved to the suburbs now, their shops and restaurants have been taken over by Kurdish and Turkish families.

Christalla and Jimmy are now in their late 60s and when Andreas closes the shop for an annual month's holiday at the end of September, they'll retire. Andreas is considering selling the shop.

Along with his two helpers Jimmy and Christalla, Andreas runs the corner shop at the end of my block. He makes most of his money by importing melons. Every week in the summer, a giant lorry arrives from Andreas' farm in Cyprus and delivers several tonnes of melons to the shop.

Steve Sneeling drives Team 3 to Warren Street staion to repair a rail. Team 3 based in Camden are one of 15 six man teams of the ERU.

On call throughout the night, at 3.10 they receive a call to fix a wing rail at Warren Street Station. Team 3 talk to a member of London Underground staff before entering the tunnel.

Entering a tunnel on foot in London's Undeground system requires strict protocols. Here Brian Hathaway of the Emergency Response Unit 'books' a portion of the track. Bill has to ensure that the track is not live before anyone is allowed onto it.

Unknown to most Londoners, the Emergency Response Unit (ERU) are the capital's fourth emergency service, on call day and night to handle accidents and derailments on London Underground's expansive tube network.

Team 3 meet with a standard maintenance team and replace a 400 pound broken rail using mostly hand tools. The ERU played a pivotal role in the July 7 2006 Tube bombings, helping to clear stations and remove the dead and evacuate passengers and the wounded. Later they made the stations safe to allow for forensics work.

Prodigy shot the video for their single “Voodoo People” in one night, in Romford shopping centre in East London.

Prodigy shot the video for their single “Voodoo People” in one night, in Romford shopping centre in East London.

Prodigy shot the video for their single “Voodoo People” in one night, in Romford shopping centre in East London.

Prodigy shot the video for their single “Voodoo People” in one night, in Romford shopping centre in East London.

Prodigy shot the video for their single “Voodoo People” in one night, in Romford shopping centre in East London.

Prodigy shot the video for their single “Voodoo People” in one night, in Romford shopping centre in East London.

Prodigy shot the video for their single “Voodoo People” in one night, in Romford shopping centre in East London.

Prodigy shot the video for their single “Voodoo People” in one night, in Romford shopping centre in East London.

Belgian artist Jan de Cock created a series of installations integrated into the space of the Tate Modern. Constructed of planes of interlocking wood, they appear as functional as an interior space or building, but have no doors, only windows or niches that require people to peer into an interior space they cannot enter.

Belgian artist Jan de Cock created a series of installations integrated into the space of the Tate Modern. Constructed of planes of interlocking wood, they appear as functional as an interior space or building, but have no doors, only windows or niches that require people to peer into an interior space they cannot enter.

Belgian artist Jan de Cock created a series of installations integrated into the space of the Tate Modern. Constructed of planes of interlocking wood, they appear as functional as an interior space or building, but have no doors, only windows or niches that require people to peer into an interior space they cannot enter.

Belgian artist Jan de Cock created a series of installations integrated into the space of the Tate Modern. Constructed of planes of interlocking wood, they appear as functional as an interior space or building, but have no doors, only windows or niches that require people to peer into an interior space they cannot enter.

Belgian artist Jan de Cock created a series of installations integrated into the space of the Tate Modern. Constructed of planes of interlocking wood, they appear as functional as an interior space or building, but have no doors, only windows or niches that require people to peer into an interior space they cannot enter.

Belgian artist Jan de Cock created a series of installations integrated into the space of the Tate Modern. Constructed of planes of interlocking wood, they appear as functional as an interior space or building, but have no doors, only windows or niches that require people to peer into an interior space they cannot enter.

Henry Furniss, Tri Athlete Riding past his home in Camden, London

Brian Haw, Anti-Iraq War Protestor Brian started his one man campaign against the Irag War by camping outside the Houses of Parliament in June 2001. He remains to this day, despite numerous attempts to remove him by the police and the government.

Scotch Bonnets and other chillis about to be prepared for a Trinidadian meal

Bottles seen through an engraved glass door at Volupte Lounge, a cocktail and cabaret bar near central London.

Creme eggs roll off the production line at the Cadbury's factory in Bournville, near Birmingham.

Unwaxed Lemons on display at the High Road House Brasserie.

Freshly squeezed fruit drinks on display High Road House Brasserie.

A waiter stands behinnd the bar at High Road House, an elegantly designed brasserie, private members' club and boutique hotel unexpectedly situated in suburban Chiswick, West London.

The interior of High Road House Brasserie.

Dawn, the owner of 'the Cheese Box' serves sheep’s cheese from her vintage Citroen van.

'The Cheese Box' provides local home delivery of cheese and on Saturday is open to passing customers in Gypsy Hill, South London.

Various cheeses on display in 'the Cheese Box.'

Morfudd Richards, owner of 'Lola’s Ice Box' offers a beetroot and cassis sorbet.

'Lola’s on Ice' psychedelic vintage ice cream van in Clapham in South London sells unusual flavoured ice creams such as beetroot and horeseradish, made from organic and seasonal ingredients.

A 'Lola’s on Ice' menu listing ice creams flavours such as 'horseradish ice cream with beet crisps.'

A cocktail prepared in one of several bars at Sketch in central London. Sketch was conceived by chef Pierre Gagnaire and restauranteur Mourad Mozouz as a destination place for food, art and music.

Free runners practise parkour in and around landmarks in London's financial district to promote Intel computer processors. For Hill and Knowlton Public Relations

Roller skaters glide in and around landmarks in London's financial district to promote Intel computer processors. For Hill and Knowlton Public Relations

Free runners practise parkour in and around landmarks in London's financial district to promote Intel computer processors. For Hill and Knowlton Public Relations

Zandra Rhodes, Fashion Designer In a flower shop close to her workshop near London Bridge.

Free runners practise parkour in and around landmarks in London's financial district to promote Intel computer processors. For Hill and Knowlton Public Relations

Free runners practise parkour in and around landmarks in London's financial district to promote Intel computer processors. For Hill and Knowlton Public Relations

Free runners practise parkour in and around landmarks in London's financial district to promote Intel computer processors. For Hill and Knowlton Public Relations

When finished the wind farm comprised 21 turbines providing electricity for the equivalent of 25,000 homes.

A worker peers inside a hub to which the blades are attached. The hub contains internal controls allowing placement of the blade.

Nose cones sit on the side of the harbour at Wick on the north east coast of Scotland. Parts are built in Denmark, shipped to the port of Wick and then transported inland and assembled on site.

Workers move a blade into position.

A worker slips a hoop attached to a crane around the blade, allowing it to be lifted.